• Shelli's & Susan's Guide to Portland

    Let us Help You Find a Home and a Neighborhood

    Welcome to our website about the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. It's our way of helping you become acquainted with the neighborhoods and communities of the Portland metro area and to inform you about the Portland area housing market. Your comments and suggestions about the website are always welcome. 

    If you have questions or if you're interested in buying or selling a home in the Portland area, contact us online or call Susan at (503) 497-2984 or Shelli at (503) 497-5061.

    Susan Marthens —  Principal Real Estate Broker/CRS GRI
    Shelli Gowdy — Real Estate Broker

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  • New Listings in the Five County Metro Area

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    New Listings by Area in the City of Portland

    Northwest Portland  ♦  Southwest Portland  ♦   Southeast Portland ♦   Northeast Portland  ♦  North Portland  ♦  All Areas

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    Homes for Sale by Community in the Portland Metro Area

    Beaverton  ♦  Dunthorpe  ♦  Happy Valley  ♦  Lake Oswego  ♦  Milwaukie  ♦  Portland  ♦  Sherwood  ♦  Tigard  ♦  Tualatin  ♦  West Linn

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  • Homes

    Another record setting  month for Portland-area housing prices

    12 February — The dawn of a new year didn't stop the record-setting momentum of the Portland-area housing market, as the region posted more closed sales last month than any other January since the Regional Multiple Listing Service began issuing its monthly reports in 1992. The 1,859 closed sales reflected a 25.9 percent annual increase over January 2015, according to the latest report. The market has been on a tear – December and July of last year also set records for closed sales, and the months in between posted the highest numbers the area has seen since red-hot 2005.  Read more...

    Mayor candidate Wheeler proposes Renters Bill of Rights because of affordable rental shortage

    12 February — Responding to increasing rents and stagnating wages, Portland mayoral candidate Ted Wheeler proposed a Renters Bill of Rights on Thursday that also promised to increase the supply of affordable housing. “Portlanders face some of the fastest rising rents in the country. It is time for the city to step up to ensure renters are being treated fairly and that landlords are following the law. Today’s proposal provides a path to ensuring that people aren’t being priced out and moved out of this community," said Wheeler, who is state treasurer.  Read more...

    Affordable homes built from plastic waste

    10 February — The Mexican company EcoDomum has come up with a unique and very sustainable way of providing affordable housing for the less fortunate. They are manufacturing roofs and wall panels using discarded plastic, which they use to build homes with the help of a local housing programs. The end result is a large number of sustainable homes measuring about 430 sq ft that only cost around $280 each. The panels made from plastic waste are about eight feet long and four feet wide, and one inch thick. According to the company they are very durable, as well as impermeable. They are also affordable, while the company can produce around 120 of them per day at their factory. In this way, they transform about 5.5 tons of discarded plastic into building materials per day. To construct a home, eight of these panels are used, which offsets around 2 tons of plastic waste. Each home can be constructed in a week.  Read more… 

    News 

    Hexavalent chromium, cancer agent, pulled by two Portland glass manufacturers

    13 February — Two Portland glass companies that use hexavalent chromium, a carcinogenic metal made famous by a Julia Roberts movie, have agreed to stop at the request of Oregon environmental regulators. But while one agreed to a state plea to stop using all chromium compounds in its stained glass manufacturing, the other refused. Bullseye Glass Co. in Southeast Portland told the state it will continue using another type, trivalent chromium, said Nina DeConcini, an Oregon Department of Environmental Quality regional administrator. DeConcini said the state is concerned because it is possible for trivalent chromium as a raw ingredient to result in hexavalent chromium emissions. Uroboros Glass in North Portland has voluntarily stopped using all chromium compounds, she said.  Read more…

    Gun sales loophole: Background check bill clears committee after changes

    13 February — Oregon gun-buyers will still be able to obtain firearms by default if their background checks are delayed, after a House committee Thursday did away with provisions that would have forced buyers wait as long as it took for investigations to finish. Instead, the House Judiciary Committee approved an amendment to House Bill 4147 that would extend Oregon's three-day waiting period to 10 business days. The amendment came from the bill's sponsor, House Majority Leader Jennifer Williamson, D-Portland. The committee then sent the amended bill to the House floor on a party-line vote — making it the only significant gun-related legislation to move ahead this session.  Read more…

    Gresham may accommodate bees, chickens in development code

    13 February — Marijuana, beekeeping, chickens and electric fences: What do they all have in common? They will possibly gain entry to Gresham’s development code this year after new rules were set for each topic in 2015. The proposed changes could allow residents to sell plants, vegetables, fruit, eggs and honey from their front yard, none of which are currently allowed. Beekeeping and chicken-rearing are allowed in the city with specific limitations, but the updated development code will allow residents to sell what they gain from these ventures. Beekeepers petitioned the City Council to update its rules on honeybees last year, saying that many residents already kept them with little to no impact on neighbors. After discussions, the council decided to allow residents to keep six honeybee colonies on their property with a fence or dense vegetation at least 6 feet high.  Read more…

    Oregon standoff ends with a 'hallelujah'

    12 February — American flags lined the main streets of Burns and Hines by early Thursday afternoon. Typically reserved for national holidays, the display marked a special occasion: Emancipation from the fear and disruption that had plagued people here for weeks as armed militants moved among them. The militants were no more. The four holdouts who controlled the headquarters compound of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge gave up just hours earlier. For the first time since Jan. 2, the refuge 30 miles southeast of Burns was in government control, cleared of dozens of men and women from outside Oregon who insisted the refuge would never be federal property again.  Read more…

    25 romantic Valentine's Day dates

    12 February — It's that time of year again, love is in the air as Valentine's Day is just around the corner, meaning that it is time to start planning your big date for you and your loved one. Trying to decide on the perfect date can be stressful, therefore, GoLocal is here to help you out. To help make your day as stress-free as possible, GoLocal has picked out 25 romantic dates to choose from on this Valentine's Day. Enjoy!  Read more…

    Oregon Senate passes minimum wage boost, House up next

    12 February — Oregon lawmakers have taken a big step toward increasing the state's minimum wage. Oregon senators passed, by a party-line 16-12 vote, the proposed three-region minimum wage measure proposed by the chamber's Democrats last week. Senate Bill 1532 now goes to the Oregon House. The measure would phases in hikes over six years. Portland-area workers would make $14.75, those in other parts of the state would make between $12.50 and $13.50.  Read more…

    A self-cleaning Willamette River

    12 February — The Willamette River pours through downtown Portland at a rate of about 33,000 cubic feet per second on average. The flow fluctuates depending on the season, with its low point in August, somewhere around 9,000 cubic feet per second, and the high in December at roughly 80,000. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is banking on that flow to perform the bulk of the work to remediate a century of industrial pollution that has accumulated in the riverbed.  Read more…